Baikal (Байкал), the Soviet Coca-Cola?

Baikal (known in Russian as Байкал “bai-kal”), was first created in the Soviet Union in the late 1960s’  partially as a response to Coca Cola’s rapidly expanding presence throughout the world.  Although Coca Cola wasn’t even being sold in the country at the time – even Pepsi beat them to the punch – Baikal’s producers wanted to instill pride in the nation. Thus, they adopted the name Baikal, showing deference to the storied Siberian lake, the largest freshwater lake in the world by volume.

How would I describe the flavor?  Different.  It had a hint of coniferous tree, processed sugar, and some unusual mix of herbs which I couldn’t quite place at the time.  Apparently, Baikal’s ingredients include black tea extract, lemon oil, cardamom oil, eucalyptus oil -what?  can we even consume this one? – and eleutherococcus senticosus, aka Siberian ginseng aka devil’s bush, known to be both an adaptogen and part of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

You may not think of Russia these days as a soda powerhouse, and that’s possibly because you didn’t grow up in the Soviet Union, or in a Russian-speaking neighborhood.  They’ve got quite a loyal following for some drinks – if I can find the picture, I will also write about the neon green tarragon-flavored soda – and the flavors from decades ago sound equally tantalizing.


Does pine-flavored soda intrigue you?  Or, have you given up on sodas all together and go straight for the sugar packets?

Moscow’s Quirky Vending Machines

Though Russian points of interest will make future appearances on LearningFeelsGood, most fresh in my recent stroll through trip photos is the unexpected amusement found in the form of Moscow vending machines…and here I thought Japan had already cornered the market on this stuff.

Without further ado, let’s take a gander at a few surprising – and one not so surprising – souvenirs:

Moscow, Russia - Putin T-Shirt Vending Machine

Now you too can own a t-shirt of Dear Leader Putin wearing shades.  Or a hat.  Or neither.  Not to mention, why isn’t Patriot Box written in Russian too?  Because locals.  Already.  Know.

Moscow, Russia - Contact Lense Vending Machine

Contact lenses in a vending machine.  Stick your eye into that little slot in the lower right…no, that’s not it.  So then, was this purpose-built with one person in mind?  Yeah, if I had my own vending machine, it would probably sell pillows.  Or tacos.

Moscow, Russia - Japanese Vending Machine

This is a neat idea–a vending machine selling only Japanese products.  When I bought a bottle of green tea from this one, it uttered “有り難う御座います” (arigatou gozaimasu/thank you).  Also, note that the upper left sign is pointing to the hot drinks, and the lower right, the chilled drinks.

 

Actual oranges being squeezed in this Zummo machine, presumably with nothing else added…sweeeeet!  But, how long have they been sitting there?

Moscow, Russia - Caviar Vending Machine

Food.  Well, to me at least.  This is what you were expecting to find in Russia, right– a caviar vending machine?  Maybe by the Caspian Sea.

Even with the agreeable exchange rate, I still didn’t dive in to a jar of икра (ee-kra).  Guess I’ll have to settle for the fake stuff for now.


Which of these products, if any, appeals most to you?  Seen any vending machines in Moscow that should be added to the list?